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WSU/Pend Oreille Extension introduced the Sense of Place series in 1999, with a focus on place-based stewardship education. Since 2001, a partnership with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department (KNRD) has supported this newsletter and allowed us to expand class offerings through EPA funding. Further staff support comes through Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA). Many thanks to our partners and to you, our readers, for your continued enthusiasm for "digging" into the natural history and culture of this part of the world.

Waterfront Landscaping Questions and Answers


Pend Oreille County Noxious Weed Board (Flyer and website through Watershed Implementation Team)

What is the ideal landscape?

One that is good for you, wildlife and water quality.

How do you plan to use your waterfront property?

Your waterfront property can be used as a home site, for recreational activities and as a haven for wildlife. Landscaping with our region’s beautiful native trees, shrubs, forbs, and grasses can help you achieve all of your objectives.

What will it cost?

The cost can vary depending on the existing condition of your waterfront property and how elaborate you want to get. The range can be from a few hundred dollars on up.

Will my waterfront landscape take a lot of time to maintain?

It will depend upon the current condition of your property and the plants you choose. Native plants are adapted to our climate and once established, require no supplemental irrigation, unlike exotic ornamentals.

As with any landscaping, you’ll want to closely manage potential weed growth. Healthy ground covers can prevent weeds from becoming established.

How do I create a planting plan for my waterfront property?

Answering some questions will assist you in creating your plan. The Pend Oreille River in the Box Canyon Reservoir, Roverbank Stabilization Guidelines publication is a good tool to increase your knowledge of a healthy shoreline. It is available on the Pend Oreille County Community Development website.

We encourage you to create a plan that will ensure the full enjoyment of your waterfront property for many years. A questionnaire, guidelines, plant lists and a plan template will be available on the Pend Oreille County Weed Board website.

When choosing your plants, ensure that you never plant noxious weeds along the shoreline or into natural waters. The current weed list is also available on the Weed Board website.

Do I need a permit?

Probably. Permits are required to do extensive work along the shoreline bank: The use of heavy equipment, building any structures such as a dock, removing large quantities of natural vegetation or aquatic weed control.

The Pend Oreille County Community Development Department , Weed Board, Washington State Department of Fish and Wiildlife and Department of Ecology have permit processes for these activities. If you need a major bank stabilization project, the Pend Oreille Conservation District has programs to assist with project development and implementation funding. The permitting agencies are more than willing to help you through the permit process.

For more information visit:

Pend Oreille County Noxious Weed Board • http://www.pendoreille.org

Pend Oreille County Community Development Department • http://www.pendoreille.org

Pend Oreille Conservation District • http://www.pocd.org

Washington State Department of Ecology • http://www.ecy.wa.gov

Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife • http://wdwf.wa.gov

Permit Sites:

Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife • http://wdwf.wa.gov

Washington Environmental Permitting Information • http://www.epermitting.wa.gov

Pend Oreille County Community Development Department • http://www.pendoreille.org

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